FAQs

Do I need to be a member to participate at Temple Micah?

Not at all! We welcome anyone who wants to join us, both in person and online, at any of our services, learning sessions, and community actions.

How can I join events and services online?

We’re excited to see you on Zoom! You can learn more about our upcoming virtual services and programs on Micah Online, join our email list for weekly updates, or email us and we will help you get connected.

Is the building open during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Currently, in response to COVID-19, the Temple Micah building is closed. To join our virtual services and events, email us.

How do I get involved and meet other people?

Show up! Come to Shabbat services. Attend a panel discussion. Join the book group or Hebrew Poetry. There are many doorways in. Check out our community groups and find new folks to meet and befriend.

What if I don’t know Hebrew?

No Hebrew? No problem. Many Micah members neither read nor speak Hebrew. While we enjoy Hebrew in our services, we also enjoy music and spirit, and you don’t need Hebrew to get swept up in both. Come join us!

Do you have to be Jewish to participate at Temple Micah?

Nope! You don’t need to be Jewish to participate. We welcome people with all kinds of experiences, histories, relationships, and interests in Judaism. More than anything, we care about the relationships we build with one another. We’re excited to get to know you, and for you to get to know us.

How does membership work?

Our membership works through our Fair Share Pledge program, which spreads the responsibility for supporting our community equitably among our members. No one is excluded because of financial constraints. Questions? Email us.

I would like to speak with a rabbi (about baby-naming, conversion, personal loss, etc). Where do I start?

You can call (202) 342-9175 or email the office; a member of our team will connect you with the rabbi who can best answer your questions.

What do people wear to services?

Anything that feels comfortable – we don’t have a formal dress code. Some people wear their everyday clothes, some their work clothes, and some dress up. Whatever you decide, you’ll fit right in. Tallitot (prayer shawls) and kippot (yarmulkes) are optional.